Slave labour under scrutiny again in China!

Posted on December 23, 2010

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A country-level civil affairs official, Mr Yi Hongqu in Sichuan province said investigators found the discovery of slave labour when authorities shut down a factory in the nations west.

For years 11 workers enslaved were sold by the shelter.

Mr Hongqu said, since 1996, Zeng Lingquan has sent at least 70 mentally disabled people to work in Beijing, Tianjin and other cities

“Investigators had found the number 70 in an account book kept by Zeng”, said Mr Hongqu.

Yi said it was apparent Mr Zeng did not know anything about the people sold into slavery.

“He seems unconcerned about their personal details”, said Yi.

This latest shocking case comes three years after the discovery of a major scandal seeing thousands forced to work in inhumane circumstances in central and northern China.

Another arrest was reported by Police of Li Xinglin, the owner of the Jiaersi Green Construction Material Chemical Factory in Xinjiang who was attempting to enslave workers to the Sichuan shelter.

Li claimed he had paid a lump sum of 9,000 yuan ($1350) to the shelter for delivery of five workers and an additional 300 yuan for each worker per month, a prior press reported said.

Claims have been recorded of workers slaving away for long hours in polluted and unsanitary conditions. They often suffered beating, ate the same food as dogs belonging to the factory’s boss, the Beijing News said.

It was not specified the exact measure of the workers disabilities, yet the ages ranged from 20 to 50 years old.

To date, there is no official number of how many workers were actually enslaved and when the news broke, the nation was left in shock.

A parliamentary investigation has reported close to 53, 000 migrant workers being ilegally employed in over 2,000 illegal brick kilns in one province alone.

Many similar cases  are reported intermittently since the discovery of the these cases.

ENDS

N.B. this story fabricated for educational purposes.

original story

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Posted in: World News